Wednesday, 29 September 2021

More Conventional Autumn?

Following yesterdays headlines, and the thunder & lightning and heavy rain last night, today the Daily Express says "Mountain hikers in Scotland are battling against harsher winds and blizzards, while much of the UK has seen a drastic drop from the unseasonably balmy September. It comes as meteorologists suggest a cold front will strike the UK as October begins, bringing a more conventional autumn."

There has been a noticeable drop in temperatures as the Indian Summer has come to an end. Looking forward a little 


I had planned a visit to the allotment on Saturday this week as I could not arrange cover for my wife on Sunday, but looking at the weather it may just be a swift visit to the greenhouse to water and harvest tomatoes. At the moment at least the weekend of the 9th & 10 October is looking good.  

Tuesday, 28 September 2021

In My Seed Box For 2022 - Cauliflower

The life expectancy of cauliflower seed if kept in ideal conditions is 5 - 8 years. The saved to sow by date on most packs is only 2 years, I found one pack that was 4 years, Thus seeds should be viable but with a reducing germination rate each year for an additional 3 - 5 years beyond what it says on the pack. 

New for 2022 - Dobies - Rob Smith Range - Andromeda - 15 Seeds - £3.50
Andromeda F1 can be sown successionally and crops for months! Plants have an open habit, so it's easier to see when your cauliflowers are ready to harvest, plus there are less hiding places for slugs and caterpillars. Modern breeding in cauliflowers, producing plants that keep a white curd even when they are exposed to sunlight. No need to cover the curd. Plants stand well and are slow to bolt, very good, nutty flavour. 
Height 50-60cm 
Width 60cm. 
Sow indoors or in a cold greenhouse January - May in good quality compost 5mm (1/4") deep in trays. When large enough too handle, transplant to individual pots and grow on.   
Plant out Harden off and plant out after the last frost at a spacing of March-July, at a spacing of 600mm and firm plants in well. Alternatively , sow thinly in a seed bed in April / May and transplant to final growing position when large enough to handle .
Protect plants from butterflies and pigeons by using netting. 
Harvest June - October.   


My History with Cauliflower is somewhat checkered, early on I had some really fantastic results but over the past years not so good. In my seed box for 2022 are 

White Step F1    - Thompson & Morgan  - 30 Seeds - £3.49 - Sow By 2020
Winter Aalsmeer - Thompson & Morgan - 50 Seeds - £2.49 - Sow By 2020

All Year Round   - Thompson & Morgan - 150 Seeds - £2.49 - Sow By 2021
Amsterdam F1    - Mr Fothergill's            -  25 Seeds - £ Mag - Sow by 2022

Sunset F1           - Marshalls                   -  15 Seeds - £2.29 - Sow by 2022

Orkney F1          - D.T.Brown                   -  30 Seeds - £2.59 - Sow by 2023

Cauliflower Zaragoza F1 - Dobies            - 20 Seeds - £3.49 - Saved year ending 2021

Andromeda F1 - Dobies                           -  15 Seeds - £3.50 Saved year ending 2022 


Sowing Times vary for each variety

                                Indoors      Outside     Plant Out     Harvest 
All Year Round    - Feb - May   Mar-Jun                        Jun - Sep 
Amsterdam F1    - Mar - May     June          June          Oct - Jan
Orkney F1           - Jan - Feb                       5 leaves     May - July
Orkney F1           - Sep - Oct                       5 leaves     May - July
Sunset F1           - Feb - Apr    Apr - May                       Aug - Oct 
White Step F1     -                    May - June                    Aug - Nov
Winter Aalsmeer -                    My - Mid Jun                  April

Sowing Plan

Jan - Orkney F1
Feb -  All Year Round
Feb - Sunset F1
Feb - Zargoza F1  
Mar - Amsterdam F1
Mar - Andromeda 
Apr - All Year Round
May - Winter Aalsmeer         


Cauliflower Orkney F1 - arrived 28/10/2020 from D.T. Brown added to their catalogue for those who lamented the loss of Mayflower, the earliest cropping summer cauli, DT Brown have found an excellent replacement! Orkney F1 is a high quality, reliable variety which produces dense heads of large white curds from as early as May. An excellent choice to maintain a continuous harvest.  


Winter Aalsmeer
Sow Cauliflower seed from April to June. Direct sow outdoors into a well prepared seedbed, for transplanting to their final positions later on. Sow at a depth of 1cm (1/2") and distance of 30cm (12") between rows. Cauliflower plants can be transplanted to their final positions approximately 5 weeks from sowing.
Alternatively sow Cauliflower seed indoors at a depth of 1cm (1/2") in trays of free-draining, seed sowing compost and cover with a sprinkling of vermiculite. Place in a propagator or seal container inside a plastic bag at a temperature of 21C (70F) until after germination which takes 4 -7 days. Transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3") pots and grow Cauliflower plants on in cooler conditions until all risk of frost has passed and plants are large enough to be transplanted outdoors.
Gradually acclimatise Cauliflower plants to outdoor conditions over 7 - 10 days before planting in a sheltered position on firm, rich fertile, well drained soil in full sun. Prepare the soil in early spring by adding plenty of well rotted farmyard manure to the soil to improve its structure and fertility. Apply lime to acid soils to reduce the acidity and lessen the risk of clubroot. Plant cauliflowers at a distance of 25cm (10") between plants each way for 'baby heads', and 60cm (24") apart for larger heads. Cover with a protective netting or fleece to prevent attack from birds and insects. Water the plants thoroughly after planting.
All The Year Round  
Sow Cauliflower seed from March to June. Direct sow outdoors into a well prepared seedbed, for transplanting to their final positions later on. Sow at a depth of 1cm (1/2") and distance of 30cm (12") between rows. Cauliflower plants can be transplanted to their final positions approximately 5 weeks from sowing.
Alternatively sow Cauliflower seed indoors at a depth of 1cm (1/2") in trays of free-draining, seed sowing compost and cover with a sprinkling of vermiculite. Place in a propagator or seal container inside a plastic bag at a temperature of 21C (70F) until after germination which takes 4 -7 days. Transplant seedlings into 7.5cm (3") pots and grow Cauliflower plants on in cooler conditions until all risk of frost has passed and plants are large enough to be transplanted outdoors.
Gradually acclimatise Cauliflower plants to outdoor conditions over 7 - 10 days before planting in a sheltered position on firm, rich fertile, well drained soil in full sun. Prepare the soil in early spring by adding plenty of well rotted farmyard manure to the soil to improve its structure and fertility. Apply lime to acid soils to reduce the acidity and lessen the risk of clubroot. Plant cauliflowers at a distance of 25cm (10") between plants each way for 'baby heads', and 60cm (24") apart for larger heads. Cover with a protective netting or fleece to prevent attack from birds and insects. Water the plants thoroughly after planting.

Monday, 27 September 2021

In My Seed Box for 2022 - Carrots

  

If packs of seeds are kept in ideal conditions then the life expectancy for Carrot seeds is 3 to 5 years. Most seed companies give you the year packed and the sow by date which is normally 2-3 years. Dobies - only give the packed year ending date and I have set a 2 year sow by like most other companies. 

Review Of Seed Stocks in Packets Sow By 2021

Amsterdam 3   - 400 seeds - 10p Poundland Carters Tested Seeds - Sow by 7/2021
Autumn King 2 - 400 Seeds - 10p Poundland Carters Tested Seeds - Sow by 7/2021
Charisma F1    - 300 Seeds -                                               Mashalls - Sow by 9/2021 
Early Nantes 2 - 500 Seeds -                           Thompson & Morgan - Sow by 2021
Early Nantes 5 - 400 Seeds - 10p Poundland Carters Tested Seeds - Sow by 7/2021
Nantes 5        - 2000 Seeds - £1.75 - Mr Fothergill's                          - Sow By 2021 
Rondo              - 400 Seeds - 10p Poundland Carters Tested Seeds - Sow by 7/2021
Silvano F1       - 500 Seeds -                                               Mashalls - Sow by 9/2021 

Review Of Seed Stocks in Packets Sow By 2022

Chartenay Red Cored  3   - 1.300 seeds - Kings Seeds Kitchen Garden - Sow by 9/2022
Paris Market 5 - Atlas        -    750 seeds - Kings Seeds Kitchen garden - Sow by 7/2022

Review Of Seed Stocks in Packets Sow By 2024

Snowman F1                 - 350 Seeds - £2.59  - D.T.Brown      - Sow by 12/2024
Carrot Cascade F1        - 500 Seeds - £2.99  - Dobies           - Packed Year Ending 2021

Review Of Seed Stocks in Packets Sow By 2024

Ibiza F1                        - 400 Seeds - £2.99  - Dobies            - Packed Year Ending 2021
Mercurio F1                  - 300 Seeds - £2.99  - Dobies            - Packed Year Ending 2021
Autumn King 2           - 1100 Seeds - £1.99 - Suttons             - Packed Year Ending 2021      

Alphabetical Listing of Carrots I have grown 

                                            Sowing            Harvest
Amsterdam 2 (Solo)          - Jan – July         Apr - Oct
Amsterdam 3                     - Jan – July         Apr - Oct
Autumn King 2                   - Mar – Jul         Jun - Nov
Cascade F1                       - Feb – Jul          Jun - Nov
Charisma F1                      - Mar - Aug         Jul - Oct 
Chartenay Red Cored        - Mar – Jun        May – Oct
Chartenay Red Cored 3     - Apr – July        Jun – Nov
Early Scarlet Horn              - Feb – Jun        May - Sep
Early Nantes 2                   - Jan – July        Jul - Dec
Early Nantes 2 Frubund     - Feb – Oct        Apr - Nov
Early Nantes 5                   - Mar – Jul         May – Oct
Flyaway                             - May – Jun        Aug - Oct
Ibiza F1                             - Mar - Jun          Jun - Oct 
Jitka F1                              - Mar – Jul         Jun - Nov
Mercurio F1                       - Feb - April        Jun - Sept
Nandor F1*                        - Mar – Jul         Jun - Oct
Nairobi                               - Jan – Jun         Jul - Nov
Nantes 2 – Frubund           - Feb – Oct         Apr - Nov
Nantes 5                             - Mar – Jul         May - Oct
Nigel F1 Hybrid                  - Mar – Jun         Jul - Dec
Paris Market - Atlas*          - Mar – July        Jun - Oct
Rainbow                             - Apr – Jun         Jul - Oct - Thompson & Morgan
Rainbow Mix                      - Mar – Jun           Jun – Sep - Marshalls
Romance F1                       Feb – May          Jun - Sep
Rondo
Royal Chantenay 3           - Mar – Jun           Jun – Oct
Silvano F1                         - Apr  May          Sep - Mar
Snowman F1                     - Mar - Aug           Jun - Oct 
St Valery                           - Mar – Jul           Jun – Nov
Sugarsnaps 54 F1             - Mar – Jul            Jun - Nov - Mr Fothergills
Sugarsnaps 54 F1             - Apr – Jun            Aug - Mar - Unwins

*  Short ideal for starting in loo rolls

Sow Date Listing for Varieties that have historically been in My Seed Box

                                        Sowing

Amsterdam 2 (Solo)         - Jan
Amsterdam 3                    - Jan
Early Nantes 2                   -Jan
Early Nantes 2 Frubund   - Feb
Romance F1                    - Feb
Mercurio F1                      - Feb
Autumn King 2                 - Mar
Chartenay Red Cored      - Mar
Early Nantes 5                 - Mar
Ibiza F1                            - Mar
Jitka F1                            - Mar
Nandor F1                        - Mar
Nigel F1 Hybrid                - Mar
Paris Market – Atlas         - Mar
Rainbow Mix                    - Mar - Marshalls
Royal Chantenay 3          - Mar
Snowman F1                   - Mar
St Valery                          - Mar
Sugarsnaps 54 F1           - Mar
Rainbow                           - Apr - Thompson & Morgan
Sugarsnaps 54 F1            - Apr
Chartenay Red Cored 3   - Apr - kings Seeds
Flyaway                            - May

Germination 10 - 21 days

Rows  250 - 300 apart

An interesting thread re the different sowing times for Sugarsnaps 54 F1 and Varieties that will over winter on the Grow Your Own Grapevine Carrot Confusion

Other cold tolerant varieties are Eskimo (T&M) and Marion (Marshalls),


Sunday, 26 September 2021

Sunday Morning Visit


From Left to right the D.T.Brown - Long Cropping Raspberry Collection that consists of 6 canes each of the following three varieties: Malling Juno (early) far left, Tulameen Pearl (mid) 2nd from left, Polka (late) 4th from left 

Autumn Treasure (late) 3rd from the left was sent in error instead of Polka.

Sunday Malling Juno and Tulameen Pearl got a trim up as the canes had grown so tall and were bending over and were in the way. Not much in the way of fruit in this first year from these two varieties but the beds have really established themselves and the number of additional canes is quite impressive in its first year, and I have great expectations for next year.

Malling Juno (early) - Tasting the first raspberries of the season is always a treat and Malling Juno is one of the best on the market. The medium to large berries have a firm texture and a deliciously sweet flavour - just perfect for eating fresh. The spine-free canes are leafy, easy to handle and prune and, the fruits are well presented, so picking is easy too! Cropping from early to late June (even earlier if grown under cover), plants are known to have excellent disease resistance as well. Bred by East Malling Research.

Very few Raspberries in the first year, but such growth once they got going, hoping they will give a super yield next spring.

Tulameen Pearl (mid) - Tulameen Pearl is far superior to the popular Tulameen which D.T Brown have sold in the past. They think this vigorous new strain is a real find and you are sure to agree it’s a winner. It has a high yield with berries which are larger and brighter and the fruit is firmer so keeps better once picked, though we doubt these fruits will last long in any household with a taste like this!

Again not a great yield in the first year, but a good number of additional canes in the first year and looking forward to seeing what next year will bring.  

Polka (late) - A multi-award winner at the National Fruit Show, Polka has exceptional fruit quality and the large, medium red berries are full of fragrant zesty flavour. Bred in Poland with Autumn Bliss as one of its parents, the virtually spine-free raspberry canes will yield double the crop of Autumn Bliss and Polka crops up to 2 weeks earlier, from late July to October. Polka even grows well on less desirable soils. 

Only came March this year, there are a few Raspberries on the canes which have a small amount of growth, but hoping for a good harvest next Autumn.

Due to an error in dispatch I received were Autumn Treasure and not Polka D.T Brown Customer Services who were excellent to deal with kindly sent the Polka so I've ended up with four beds of Raspberries, with Autumn Treasure in the 3rd Bed and Polka in the 4th Bed when looking at the raspberry patch towards the main path.  

Autumn Treasure (late) - Bred at the world renowned East Malling Research centre, is set to be the benchmark for home gardeners. This quality primocane has a high disease resistance to root rot, wilt and powdery mildew, and crops well even on poorer ground. It gives an exceptional yield of very attractive, large, firm berries from August to October and the fruit stands wet weather very well. The flavour is very good indeed - not as acid as Autumn Bliss. Spine free canes.

I'm very impressed with the amount of Raspberries that this variety has given in the first year, I had a similar amount of Raspberries last week and there are a number of green raspberries forming and the bees were doing their thing on them as I was harvesting.

There were also those particular raspberries that were not in a condition to be taken home and that had to be consumed as I was harvesting.

It was indeed a very lucky accident that Autumn Treasure were sent in error.


 


 

There isn’t a wire at the very top of the scaffold tubes as the Owls sit on top, So I had a hunt around in my timber store and found an old broom handle and have extended the owls perch so I can run a top wire.





I still have one more Rhubarb bed to dig and then transplant the third Rhubarb Livingstone from D.T.Brown into its own bed, hopefully I will be able to do this sooner than later.  I have not pulled any rhubarb this first year and some has gone to seed and I have just cut those bits off.

It is recommended for strong and healthy growth that you don't harvest rhubarb in the first year, and take only a few stalks in the second year. When you have established plants of, three or more years old, rhubarb is ready to harvest from spring onwards, as soon as the stalks are long enough – between 300 – 600mm, depending on the variety.

Note to Self:  Measure the length of the stalks produced this year out of interest.



On the agenda next for the day was to top up the Quadgrows, whilst the water but was feeding the Quadgrows I cleared the foliage back around the tomatoes to let more airflow, the top of the gable was quite dense with growth. 

Next year I will make sure I snip off and leave a small gap between the toms and the roofing sheets. The tomatoes in the photo are turning red and were not quite ready for harvesting.



Tomatoes harvested from the plot 1 Greenhouse

Next I decanted a bucket load of D.T.Browns Sarpo KilifiPotatoes from one of the Buckets, then got the scales out to see what kind of yield I had managed from four seed potatoes.

1865g of potatoes

There were many cucumbers that have over ripened and turned yellow, Some of those will be used for seed harvesting and the green ones have gone to other plot holders and my neighbours, but from the look of things I doubt if there will be any more cucumbers as the weather is turning as we slip into Autumn.


The larger tomatoes in bottom right corner came off the Crimson Plum plant that is out in the open on the plot. There are some minor signs of blight but I’m hoping it will continue to resist the full onset and will provide me with a harvest next week.

I watered the Beetroots and topped up two Daleks this morning and then it was time to make my way home for Sunday lunch. 

Saturday, 25 September 2021

Back British Farming

 


Help secure the future of British food

Click HERE to add your support to the National Farmers Union letter to the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs and ask him to keep food self-sufficiency levels above 60%

Food self-sufficiency is Britain’s ability to feed ourselves using only food produced here. Show you care about the future of British food. The more people who add their name to our letter below, the more powerful it will be. We will send this with your support to the government minister in charge of food, George Eustice MP.

Here is the letter

Dear Secretary of State,
 
The issue of self-sufficiency – our ability to feed ourselves using only food produced in this country – is a barometer of British farming as a global leader.

In 2020, the UK’s overall food self-sufficiency was 60%. In 1984, it was 78%.

We are calling on you, as a champion of British farming, to make sure our self-sufficiency levels do not fall any further and every opportunity is seized to increase them.

The best way to do this is by setting a target for Britain’s food production levels, using self-sufficiency as a key metric, as part of the Government's Food Security report which is due to be published this year. 

This figure will clearly show if we are becoming more or less reliant on the rest of the world to feed us as a nation.

British food is some of the highest quality, safest, and most nutritious in the world. We have the climate and the natural resources to produce fresh, affordable food for everyone, in every corner of the UK. But we cannot be global leaders if our own production levels drop and we have less to export.

We want the government to work with British farmers, as laid out in our British Food: Leading the Way report (to be launched on Wednesday), to produce more food that we are great at producing because of our landscape, soils and climate.

Of course, we accept that there are always going to be some foods that our natural environment just won’t enable us to grow, but as a country we should be ambitious to provide more food for people in the UK and around the world.

By not allowing self-sufficiency to drop below 60% you will show that British farming is leading the way. To be truly ambitious the UK Government could aim to increase British food production, our self-sufficiency percentage, and the amount of British food consumed at home and exported overseas.

Yours sincerely,

Friday, 24 September 2021

Growing Bugs Bunny Carrots

 

For some time I have wanted to grow some long exhibition type Bugs Bunny carrots. In 2022 I'm going to have a bash by using one of the large water butts I have that is cracked on the bottom and sawing the top off, then filling it with the sharp sand that I used in my milk bottle "soft bricks" that were used to hold down netting and planting/weed membrane that I replaced with paving blocks this year. Bore holes in the sand with a rainwater down pipe and fill the bores up with compost and sowing 3-4 seeds per bore then thinning to healthiest looking plant.


The Bugs Bunny type carrots that I'm going to grow both come from Dobies and are New Varieties for 2022 introducing:-

Dobies - Mercurio F1 - Code 43 39 81 -  300 Seeds - £2.99 non members  

Mercurio F1’ is the early harvesting carrot variety. It has good bolting resistance so it stands on the ground longer. Vigorous and upright habit, smooth skin and excellent colour. 

180-200 mm long roots, 30 - 50 mm wide, delicious raw or steamed.

Sow:      February to April
Harvest: Late June to September 



Dobies - Ibiza  - Code 43 39 21 -  400 Seeds - £2.99 non members  


Ibiza F1, offers the quality and taste of a Nantes, with the shape of an Imperator. Incredibly sweet, perfect for snacking, has better colour and taste than 'SugarSnax 54'.

300mm long, tapered, smooth roots with 30 - 40mm wide shoulders and very dark orange colour. Look great in raised beds and borders. 

Sow: March-June 18mm (3/4") deep in drills 230mm - 300mm apart. Thin seedlings when the first rough leaves appear. repeating as necessary until plants are 50mm - 75mm apart. Sow thinly to minimise thinning (which can attract Carrot Root Fly)

Harvest:  June-October.

There will be blog posts next year when I set up the cut down water butt and try growing these varieties and next June - October we will see the results. I may even try some successional sowings between February - June of both varieties so that I can extend the harvest period from June to October If I can find more water butts or make some small raised beds and have enough sand.  

I'm also thinking that I will try different composts in different bores to see which perform the best.    

Thursday, 23 September 2021

In My Seed Box For 2022 - Cabbages & Spring Greens

  


In the past I have tried to find different varieties that had different sow grow and harvest times so that I could try grow and harvest for as long as possible. Plans for 2020 didn't pan out due to shielding my wife against Covid-19, and 2021 was not a lot better, so lets try and make the magic happen in 2022. Cabbage Seeds if kept in ideal conditions last 4 - 7 years, so I will expect a reduced germination rate when I sow the remainder of 2018 seed stock.  

Opened Zippy Bags

Cabbage Ball                          - Mr Fothergill's              - 500 Seeds - £1-65 - Sow By 2018
Winter Jewel F1                      - Thompson & Morgan  -  40 Seeds - £2-99 - Sow By 12/2018
Golden Acre/ Primo (II)          Mr Fothergill's              - 500 Seeds - £1-65 - Sow By 2018
Spring Greens Greensleeves  Mr Fothergill's            -   50 Seeds - £3-25 - Sow By 2019
Dutchman F1 Heart                Mr Fothergill's             -   30 Seeds - £3-25 - Sow By 2019
Savoy King F1                        - Mr Fothergill's             -   50 Seeds  - £3-25 - Sow By 2019
Greyhound                             - Thompson & Morgan  -  200 Seeds - £1-49 - Sow By 12/2019
Durham Early                        - Premier Seeds Direct   -   3grms     - Sow By 2020
Tundra F1                              - Marshalls                     - 100 Seeds - Sow By 09/2019
Primo 2                                  - Marshalls                     - 500 Seeds - Sow By 09/2018


To be grown in 2022

Cabbage - Dobies - 43 32 71 - (Red) Romanov F1 - 65 Seeds - £2.99


Elongated red cabbage like a rugby ball, up to 2KG in weight. Romanov F1 is a very tender and sweet-tasting cabbage. Ideal for salads and slaw, a real summer cabbage; also very good for pickling and braising with apple and red wine for Christmas. Good holding ability without splitting. 

Sow late February - May, (or October for an early crop next year) into a finely raked seedbed of moist, warm soil at a depth of 10mm 

Germination 7 - 14 days 

Transfer young plants with a trowel when large enough to handle into their final growing positions, allow 300mm (12") between plants each way. 

Seeds can also be started off in trays or modules. Consider using cabbage collars to stop cabbage root fly and use netting to protect from butterflies.

Harvest July - December, can also be overwintered for an earlier harvest if sown in Oct. for a harvest in May - July (Year 2) 



Spring Green Seeds - Greensleeves from Marshalls for £1.99 incl. P&P


Going through my extensive cabbage seed collection and looking for something that looks like it may provide the Spring Greens that SWMBO loves, I finally had a search and found a couple of varieties that are sold as Spring Greens. I purchased a pack of Marshalls Spring Green Seeds - Greensleeves.  

SOW OUTDOORS: April-May or July-August. Sow thinly ½in (1cm) deep in a seed bed or clean module trays of firm pre watered compost. Keep soil moist at all times.

PLANT OUT: 6in (15cm) apart, in rows 12in (30cm) apart when plant has 3-4 true leaves.

HARVEST: October-November or April-May

Protect from Cabbage White Butterfly with netting.

Looking at the sowing instructions in particular the spacing and rows, I thought about the planting membrane sheets that I already have and decided to create a new one specifically for the Spring Greens in 2020

So the idea is to give a 300mm exclusion zone around the perimeter so that hopefully it keeps the spring greens away from the netted hoops that will go over the bed. working on the basis of 150mm centres and 300mm between rows, I decided to stagger alternate rows so there is a little more space between plants but they are still dense enough to assist in growing as spring greens.   


I've also bought a pack of Cabbage Durham Early Spring Green Seeds for £1.39 incl. P&P from Premier Seeds Direct for an Autumn sowing.

This variety is a well-known and very reliable compact spring cabbage producing dark green pointed firm heads of medium size, good flavour and texture. Suited for high density growing for spring greens harvesting from Feb onwards and Apr for fully mature heads. Autumn sowing variety.



Cultivation Advice Cabbage Durham Early Spring Greens


  • Sow between Mid-July and Sep thinly in trays or directly to seed drills using 2-3 seeds every 12 in.
  • Planting depth 1/8 inch. When seedlings are 1 inch tall thin to one plant every 12-18 inches or plant out tray seedlings to growing location.
  • Best sown / located in full sun where no cabbage was grown the year before.
  • Keep weed free and protect against pests, especially pigeons over-winter.
  • Harvest alternative plants from Feb as spring greens and mature heads from early Apr.




The Greensleeves Spring Green seeds are the right candidates for trying again in my AGRALAN Compact Plug Plant Trainer.